The good, the bad & the ugly

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THE GOOD

HOW TO HANDLE A COMPLAINT

IN ONE EASY LESSON

 

 

 

 

On 2 February, your scribe complained about a breach of The Data Protection Act 1998 by the Electoral Reform Services (“ERS”): it had disclosed personal data to Southern Health without the data subject’s consent. After some initial problems with junior ERS officials, the ERS CEO left a meeting at circa 15.50 hrs to talk to the data subject: at 17.32 hrs, she sent the following email to Southern Health:

ers-email

Error admitted – honest – final response checked with complainant – apology – problem solved – everybody happy – all in about 1¾ hours.

Are you listening Southern Health? You took 880 days even to honour the same data subject’s subject access request. 

And why was this so important? Southern Health did not trust your scribe to keep a promise. The words ‘pot, kettle, black’ come to mind.

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THE BAD

CAN YOU FIND YOUR CONSCIENCE?

 

 

 

There was a common thread to public questions at the Southern Health Board Meeting on 31st January, summarised as follows:

“Can the Executive Directors and Non-Executive Directors in post on 1st January 2016 [shortly after publication of the Mazars Review] find their consciences and resign?”

Similar points were made to the governors at the Council of Governors on the same day.

At the time of writing – the relevant EDs, NEDs and governors must still be looking for their consciences!  What a surprise!

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THE UGLY

FREEDOM TO SPEAK

 

 

 

 

Having attended the National Guardian’s event, we believe we wrote a report that was heavily in whistle-blowers’ favour but recognised the need to give Dr Hughes a chance.

Unfortunately, although whistle-blowers want freedom to speak up, some do not believe in the right for others to do so. I posted a perfectly innocuous comment on one whistle-blowers blog only to have it blocked and be told (amongst other things) by email:

“I neither sought nor expect any support from you.”

Is it not hypocritical for a whistle-blower to preach openness, honesty, transparency and fairness for fellow whistle-blowers whilst censoring fair comment by a patient representative? We pointed out that this blog does not censor comments, provided they are not defamatory, abusive or contain offensive language. We invited her to leave a comment – she has not done so!

She was more intent on finding out if Dr Hughes had invited us personally in order to criticise her. And all this from a whistle-blower who didn’t even attend the event.

Note to other whistle-blowers: we continue to support you and welcome your comments, especially potential and existing whistle-blowers at Southern Heath.

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THE EVEN UGLIER

HOW, AS A PUBLIC GOVERNOR, TO TREAT THE PUBLIC

 

 

 

When two members of the public tried to speak to Southern Health’s notoriously unapproachable Lead Governor, during the networking/lunch break between the Board and Governors’ meetings on 31 January, he asked the receptionist to call security!

Is this the same Andrew Jackman, who is Finance Director of Drew Holdings Ltd – a construction company, which boasts several NHS organisations in its client list – a point he fails to declare on his ‘Declaration of Interests’ at Southern Health? Surely not!

Is this the same Lead Governor who covered-up an allegation of misconduct by a NED and fled a meeting like a frightened rabbit because a BBC TV crew was filming it. Read more→ 

 

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One thought on “The good, the bad & the ugly

  1. Pingback: Appraise a NED! | Campaign for Reform At Southern Health

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